engineeringhistory
engineeringhistory:

RCA Laboratories on December 1, 1939 demonstrated its newly developed light-weight portable television field pick-up equipment before members of the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, DC.  Shown in the picture are James Lawrence Fly, Chairman of the FCC, focusing the television camera; Commissioners Thad H. Brown, Norman S. Case, and T.A.M. Craven.  The apparatus they are inspecting was developed by RCA Laboratory engineers to meet the demand for television field stations comparable in compactness to present-day sound broadcasting units.  To make the equipment portable, engineers have assembled the various components in small carrying cases varying in weight from 35 to 72 pounds each.  The complete unit was not only more efficient than, but also approximately one tenth the weight and one sixth the cost of the only other unit ever designed in the U.S. for the same purpose at the time.

engineeringhistory:

RCA Laboratories on December 1, 1939 demonstrated its newly developed light-weight portable television field pick-up equipment before members of the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, DC.  Shown in the picture are James Lawrence Fly, Chairman of the FCC, focusing the television camera; Commissioners Thad H. Brown, Norman S. Case, and T.A.M. Craven.  The apparatus they are inspecting was developed by RCA Laboratory engineers to meet the demand for television field stations comparable in compactness to present-day sound broadcasting units.  To make the equipment portable, engineers have assembled the various components in small carrying cases varying in weight from 35 to 72 pounds each.  The complete unit was not only more efficient than, but also approximately one tenth the weight and one sixth the cost of the only other unit ever designed in the U.S. for the same purpose at the time.

damnhebig

vinebox:

Then there’s always this family member who say this every family reunion

So I’m going to take a page from coolcalmcommittedyourpersonalcheerleader and start doing the gratitude post. 

One way that I have battled with depression and all that jazz is positivity. If anyone out there is looking for alternative methods to deal with mental health issues or to supplement whatever you may be doing already (therapy, medication etc) then I would highly suggest positive thinking into your repertoire. It sounds easy but you know from experience that practicing positive thinking to deal with negative, racing thoughts can be kind of hard to implement BUT it is not an impossible feat. 

Your mind is way more powerful than you give it credit for. I have been doing mental daily gratitude “posts” in my head for the past 4 yrs. I think right after my last suicide attempt is when it started.  Haven’t looked back since to be honest. It has helped the most with anxiety and depression. Ocd has it’s own set of issues but it helps me deal with intrusive thoughts part of it. The best part is that the more positive you are, the easier it is at maintaining stability.

mindblowingscience

mindblowingscience:

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mindblowingscience
mindblowingscience:

Strong, Clear Bioplastic Containers Could Be Made from Rice

Jul 30, 2014 |By William Bergius and ChemistryWorld
Researchers in Finland have transformed rice starch into a temporally stable, optically transparent, biodegradable plastic with a high degree of mechanical strength and good thermal resistance. This important step towards bioplastics made from simple and sustainable resources has potential applications in food packaging and biomedical materials.
Starch is a polysaccharide consisting of two components: a linear glucose polymer called amylose and a highly branched glucose polymer called amylopectin. Most green plants store their energy as starch and it is present in large quantities in grains such as maize, wheat and rice, in addition to tubers like potatoes.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Strong, Clear Bioplastic Containers Could Be Made from Rice

Jul 30, 2014 |By William Bergius and ChemistryWorld

Researchers in Finland have transformed rice starch into a temporally stable, optically transparent, biodegradable plastic with a high degree of mechanical strength and good thermal resistance. This important step towards bioplastics made from simple and sustainable resources has potential applications in food packaging and biomedical materials.

Starch is a polysaccharide consisting of two components: a linear glucose polymer called amylose and a highly branched glucose polymer called amylopectin. Most green plants store their energy as starch and it is present in large quantities in grains such as maize, wheat and rice, in addition to tubers like potatoes.

Continue Reading.